This talk is republished with permission by Metta Centre, teaching retrieved from http://Dhamma Talks – Metta Centre.

Venerable Mettaji will offer a Metta meditation, share his understanding of Metta and answer any questions. 

The Peace Treaty

The Right Way to Criticise Someone

0:00 – Introduction
2:26 – Meditation practice
27:59 – Importance of Metta
32:15 – Metta Sutta
34:10 – Peace Treaty
37:26 – The antidote
39:15 – Problem solving
42:33 – Partners
43:55 – Some stories
48:39 – Q & A
49:21 – Metta to ‘objects’
56:27 – Conflict at Bodhinyana
1:01:54 – Reasons for ordaining
1:07:08 – Beyond images
1:09:43 – Ajahn Brahm’s marriage ceremonies
1:12:16 – Q: Challenges practising Metta
1:12:38 – Fault-finding
1:14:55 – Self-righteousness
1:18:20 – Ego: friends & threats
1:22:07 – Pride & those who’ve harmed us
1:26:33 – Sleepiness
1:28:55 – Remorse
1:32:27 – Too effective? Wisdom & saying no
1:38:13 – Metta spirit, energy, frequency
1:40:38 – Metta to strangers
1:41:57 – Closing & dedication

About the presenter: Bhikkhu Mettaji believes that he is a very fortunate Bhikkhu to be given the opportunity to ordain late in life at Bodhinyana, which is a very precious and rare gift. His lifelong search for absolute truth started a long time ago in Europe in his teens, but sadly led to lots of cul-de-sacs and dead ends. He is in his mid-60s and believes he only found the real teachings when he touched Theravada Buddhism 10 years ago. Living and studying at Bodhinyana Monastery enabled him to finally find the real teachings. Good people with Metta sustained and nurtured him through the difficult years. His father, as an expression of Metta, often comes to mind and also his children who are young adults now. Isn’t family some of our best teachers too, even when events don’t go too well?

He was fortunate to run into an ex-monk from the Thai Forest tradition in 2009,in Sydney, who had been one of Ajahn Chah’s carers. Soon afterwards he discovered that all the teachings of the Buddha are very honest and thorough, and passed all experiential investigation. There are no loopholes in the Suttas and the Eightfold Path does gradually reduce suffering.

He tried to blend Buddhist practice into a number of senior roles that he had in the Finance and Charity sectors in Sydney but soon realised that colleagues will only practice if they want to! He finds it a blessing to have Ajahn Brahmavamso as his preceptor and access to other marvellous teachers like Ajahn Brahmali, Bhante Sujato and Bhikkhu Bodhi. Such riches! His name, Mettaji comes from a monk in the time of the Buddha and translates as ”Victory through loving kindness.” That is the aspiration he wants to fulfill in his practice and in meeting anyone, anywhere.

Facilitator: Tina Ng

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