Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question about the way of "noting" the present moment. ( sati, mindfulness )

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question about the way of "noting" the present moment. ( sati, mindfulness )

    Hello, can someone clarify this confusion about the way of "noting" the present moment since English is not my native language and have to "note" phenomena in different language which have different words for the two meanings I will specify next. In the Mahasi Sayadaw tradition the instruction is when standing to note "standing". My qustion is with what meaning: 1.What is called when a person is upright and not moving? (It is called) standing. (as a neutral impersonal description) or 2.What are you doing? - (I am) standing. (as an specific action that is done by a someone/subject) ? Lifting as : This is lifting , or I am lifting, Moving as: This is moving ,or I am moving. I am asking because I don't understand Pali and all english translations on the Accesstoinsight site on Mindfulness like Satipatthana Sutta, Anapanasati Sutta, Kayagata-sati Sutta all state to be noting as of meaning "I am breathing in" ,"I am standing" ,"I am walking" and not as meaning "this is breathing in" ,"this is standing" ,"this is walking" ?

    Kathaṃ ca pana, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati?

    Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu araññagato vā rukkhamūlagato vā suññāgāragato vā nisīdati pallaṅkaṃ ābhujitvā, ujuṃ kāyaṃ paṇidhāya, parimukhaṃ satiṃ upaṭṭhapetvā. So sato va assasati, sato va passasati. Dīghaṃ vā assasanto ‘dīghaṃ assasāmī’ ti pajānāti,5 dīghaṃ vā passasanto ‘dīghaṃ passasāmī’ ti pajānāti. Rassaṃ vā assasanto ‘rassaṃ assasāmī’ ti pajānāti, rassaṃ vā passasanto ‘rassaṃ passasāmī’ ti pajānāti. ‘Sabbakāyapaṭisaṃvedī assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati, ‘sabbakāyapaṭisaṃvedī passasissāmī’ ti sikkhati. ‘Passambhayaṃ kāyasaṅkhāraṃ assasissāmī’ ti sikkhati, ‘passambhayaṃ kāyasaṅkhāraṃ passasissāmī’ ti sikkhati.


    For example here the english translation is :

    And how, monks, does a monk dwell observing body in body?

    Here a monk, having gone into the forest, or to the foot of a tree, or to an empty room, sits down cross-legged, keeps his body upright and fixes his awareness in the area around the mouth. With this awareness, he breathes in, with this awareness, he breathes out. Breathing in a deep breath, he understands properly:5 "I am breathing in a deep breath." Breathing out a deep breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing out a deep breath." Breathing in a shallow breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing in a shallow breath." Breathing out a shallow breath, he understands properly: "I am breathing out a shallow breath." In this way he trains himself: "Feeling the whole body, I shall breathe in." "Feeling the whole body, I shall breathe out," thus he trains himself. "With the bodily activities calmed, I shall breathe in," thus he trains himself. "With the bodily activities calmed, I shall breathe out," thus he trains himself.


    Is there an specific word in the pali verse for the "I am" part (self view) or is the translation not exactly correct in transmiting the meaning and should be "He knows there is breathing in a deep breath"?
    Thank you in advance and all the best.

  • #2
    Hi, and sorry for a very late reply!

    You are right with your last question. The translation is not exactly correct; or, more correctly, it's too literal. Quotation in Pali is used much more widely than in English. That is partly because Pali has no indirect speech, but also for other reasons. So I much prefer your translation. If you read more Pali you'll find similar instances everywhere, but because most cases are not of doctrinal importance, they are usually translated more loosely, as you have done with "there is breathing".

    I see zero evidence for the noting practice in the Pali Canon, and don't belief the Buddha ever taught it. I also wouldn't encourage it myself as I find it unhelpful personally. A note takes you out of the present moment, as it is always a reply to the past, and it also encourages the thinking mind. It's much better to be still and not think at all. However, many people may find it useful. So if you do, don't feel disencouraged to continue doing it.

    Comment

    Working...
    X