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  • Daniel Wright
    started a topic Dealing with emotional pain

    Dealing with emotional pain

    This is not a question, just something I needed to say.

    Being young, and in college, you meet a lot of people...

    With that simple, small line you might be able to imagine where this is headed already. A lovely young lady has caught my eye, but during a meditation (in side a lovely piece of art work I might add, pics later) I realized that this was not the path. My logic for wanting to pursue this young lady was what I've dubbed "Mara Logic", the entire idea made so much sense in my head, it would be beautiful, and happy.. For a while...
    So the next night while sitting by the lake, (pic in the gallery) I spent about half an hour purging the entire idea of it. Afterwards I felt like... Well the only way I can properly convey the feeling is with an analogy I wrote at the time.

    The adventure and anticipation of planting an unknown seed. The pitted defeat of removing that seed before germination. The joy of the enlightened knowing what might have been.


    I am not enlightened... I don't know what might have become of that seed, and I never will. So now I'm in the process of letting it go, but it feels profound. My imagination entertains the idea of a split reality, like at that exact moment I chose to make the decision, the world had to shift in some way through space, or space had to shift around it to account for that one decision. Assuming the teachings have any merit at all, I think it will be for the better.

    Dan

  • Ruth Morrison
    replied
    Thank you for your answer, James

    Leave a comment:


  • James Taeza
    replied
    Originally posted by Daniel Wright View Post
    What I said about the teachings was rhetorical, they haven't failed me yet and I see no end to it in the future.
    Dan
    aloha dan! you know i've never really used the word "rhetoric" in my life. i've heard people use it a lot but never really paid real attention what it really means until you responded that i had to look it up what it really meant. to be brutally honest, i've never seen so many big words used and met so many intellectuals in my life other than in the forums here as i have never needed to use big or profound words in my daily life and at work, but then again that's the "limitation" of having only a high school diploma and military background. interesting, very interesting....

    i mean no offense by the way. it's just interesting for me....

    may you continue to cultivate dispassion.

    anjali ca metta.

    Leave a comment:


  • James Taeza
    replied
    Originally posted by Ruth Morrison View Post
    Hi James, just a short question: is that quote out of the suttas? And if yes, could you tell me the source?
    Anjali
    Ruth
    aloha ruth! it's a recollection (nussati) and cultivation (bhavana) to help with the development of dispassion

    anjali ca metta.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ruth Morrison
    replied
    Originally posted by James Taeza View Post
    ti-lakkhana

    sabbe sankhara anicca'ti....(unreliable all that is conditioned)
    sabbe sankhara dukkha'ti....(unsatisfactory all that is conditioned)
    sabbe dhamma anatta'ti...(all dhamma have no "self")

    yada pannaya passati (when one sees this with wisdom)
    atha nibbindati dukkhe (then one tires of suffering)
    esa maggo vissudhiya. (this is the path to purity)

    Hi James, just a short question: is that quote out of the suttas? And if yes, could you tell me the source?
    Anjali
    Ruth

    Leave a comment:


  • Daniel Wright
    replied
    Originally posted by James Taeza View Post
    ti-lakkhana

    sabbe sankhara anicca'ti....(unreliable all that is conditioned)
    sabbe sankhara dukkha'ti....(unsatisfactory all that is conditioned)
    sabbe dhamma anatta'ti...(all dhamma have no "self")

    yada pannaya passati (when one sees this with wisdom)
    atha nibbindati dukkhe (then one tires of suffering)
    esa maggo vissudhiya. (this is the path to purity)


    very good! one down, many to go. as Ajahn Chah said in a talk "a practitioner's work is never done". from my own contemplation/verification, the "mind" conjures up illusions of many sorts, even things that one may believe profound. as you go deeper into the practice you'll find that the more you delve inwards, your personal "mara" will conjure things up for you. and only you can find out how to best deal with the conjuring of "mara" within you. you'll have to put up a fight. you'll know what i mean later.
    What I said about the teachings was rhetorical, they haven't failed me yet and I see no end to it in the future.

    As for personal Mara, oh yes, I understand this concept fairly well though I suspect it's just a grain of sand on a beach. I've tried to Unlearn a lot of things that I know are culturally created, or habits that are accepted in western culture that have no place. I can't recall the Sutta's name where this simile came from, but the Simile of Refining Gold. Removing the gravel and rocks, then the finer grits and so on likened to the mind, one step at a time in order.

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • Daniel Wright
    replied
    Originally posted by Stuart Corner View Post
    Great post Daniel. Speaking from the other end of that decision - having taken the other route because I was not aware of the teachings - having seen the seed grow and mature and having made the best of it that I possibly could. And while I am grateful for all that I have and the conventional happiness it has brought me; with the benefit of hindsight, I can only say - good choice, your decision was sound ... So what now? Do you capitalise on that? Can I playfully ask, is your next choice - where do I ordain? ... No need to answer that ...


    Stuart
    xxx
    Well.. I want to finish school first of all. Then the plan was to pay back my loan and then travel. First stop Nepal or Australia, depends. Ordaining is a bit of a jump, I'd rather try monastic life or experience it part time before committing to something like that. If I do, I want it to be a full time, not a week or month here and there.
    As the Buddha often said "It depends"

    Leave a comment:


  • James Taeza
    replied
    ti-lakkhana

    sabbe sankhara anicca'ti....(unreliable all that is conditioned)
    sabbe sankhara dukkha'ti....(unsatisfactory all that is conditioned)
    sabbe dhamma anatta'ti...(all dhamma have no "self")

    yada pannaya passati (when one sees this with wisdom)
    atha nibbindati dukkhe (then one tires of suffering)
    esa maggo vissudhiya. (this is the path to purity)


    very good! one down, many to go. as Ajahn Chah said in a talk "a practitioner's work is never done". from my own contemplation/verification, the "mind" conjures up illusions of many sorts, even things that one may believe profound. as you go deeper into the practice you'll find that the more you delve inwards, your personal "mara" will conjure things up for you. and only you can find out how to best deal with the conjuring of "mara" within you. you'll have to put up a fight. you'll know what i mean later.

    as far as your statement: "Assuming the teachings have any merit at all, I think it will be for the better"....only through practice can one really see the merit of the teachings. as the great teachers would say, do the work and the results will be evident by themselves. saddha arrives that way.

    hotu te jayamangalam.

    sukhi hotu.

    anjali ca metta.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dheerayupa Sukonthapanthu
    replied
    My imagination entertains the idea of a split reality, like at that exact moment I chose to make the decision, the world had to shift in some way through space, or space had to shift around it to account for that one decision.

    This reminds me of the movie 'Sliding Doors'.

    Wish you happiness with whatever course you are choosing. :-)

    Leave a comment:


  • Stuart Corner
    replied
    Great post Daniel. Speaking from the other end of that decision - having taken the other route because I was not aware of the teachings - having seen the seed grow and mature and having made the best of it that I possibly could. And while I am grateful for all that I have and the conventional happiness it has brought me; with the benefit of hindsight, I can only say - good choice, your decision was sound ... So what now? Do you capitalise on that? Can I playfully ask, is your next choice - where do I ordain? ... No need to answer that ...

    Stuart
    xxx

    Leave a comment:

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