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  • Kindu Weerasinghe
    started a topic lust and sons ltd

    lust and sons ltd

    Dear Ajahn,

    I am writing with a certain degree of socially constructed discomfort, however my need to understand overpowers this initial dissonance.

    what did buddha say about the sexual energy that is present in all humans? i.e. what did he say about masturbation (often associated with fantasies) , is there a distinction between lay people and the monastics re masturbation? if there, is, how is it that one could control that sorta energy within oneself ? ( It just seems hugely unnatural to me)

    Thankyou in advance

  • Ajahn Brahmali
    replied
    Dear Jerrod,

    Yes, it applies to any sensuality connected with any of the five senses.

    With metta.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jerrod Lopes
    replied
    Venerable Ajahn,

    Does this apply in whole to the sensuality of other objects as well? Those such as food, to be more specific.

    Jerrod : )

    Leave a comment:


  • Kindu Weerasinghe
    replied
    thanks heaps ajahn. you answered my question well!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ajahn Brahmali
    replied
    Dear Kindu,

    what did buddha say about the sexual energy that is present in all humans? i.e. what did he say about masturbation
    Buddhist morality is based on two complimentary ideas: the first is not to hurt oneself or others and the second not to act from defilements. As with everything on the Buddhist path, the implementation of morality is gradual. The initial step is undertaking the five precepts. This is already a high degree of morality and, as you no doubt know, masturbation is not included among them. There is even evidence in the suttas of lay people who had reached the first two stages of awakening still being sexually active. This shows you that sexual activity in itself is not a serious moral issue.

    is there a distinction between lay people and the monastics re masturbation?
    For monastics, however, masturbation is out. The point here is that one tries to practice the path to its highest potential, which means avoiding acting on any sort of defilement to the best of one's ability. Full success in meditation can only come from overcoming sensuality, at least temporarily. Having no or few outlets for one's sensual desires, means you can focus directly on the desire for the purpose of overcoming it. Of course, this takes a more serious commitment, and this commitment is what monastic life largely is about. So monastic life includes a greater dedication to overcoming one's defilements, so as to maximize one's chances at attaining deep meditation.

    if there, is, how is it that one could control that sorta energy within oneself ? ( It just seems hugely unnatural to me)
    Is it really unnatural? Life as a human always involves a degree of restraint; nobody can simply follow all their whims. The more serious one is about the Buddhist path, the greater the required restraint. For example, keeping the five precepts can only be done through a fair amount of restraint. Not indulging in any form of sexual activity is just an extension of this restraint; that is, it's an extension of something we are already doing all the time. So I don't think it is right to call it unnatural. Rather, it is about the degree of commitment one has to the path. Such commitment should be as unforced and natural as possible. If it is, the restraint will come without too much internal conflict.

    How do you do it? See this thread.

    With metta.

    Leave a comment:

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