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Deciding to be ordrained?!

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  • Deciding to be ordrained?!

    Hello,

    I wanted to ask you a little question about yourselves if that okay?

    I wanted to ask you what it was like making the decision to become a monk? was it a difficult choice? where there any doubts? After all it is a big decision in.

    I have been thinking about it myself for the past 6 months, but it seems like a big decision.

    Can anyone relate to this?

    Thank you

    Jamie

  • #2
    Dear Jamie,

    Some people take many years to decide to become a monk or nun. For me I jumped straight in. I discovered Buddhism in 2005 and by 2006 I was living in the monastery. It can be very challenging at first, but usually it gets easier over time. I think it was the best thing I ever did.

    With metta,

    Bhante Jhanarato

    Comment


    • #3
      If you knew clearly why you were doing it, I don't think you'd ever regret it, Jamie. It's only a big decision if you think you have something to lose.

      That's not to say that there wouldn't be some difficulties. Difficult experiences are useful for the cultivation of compassion and empathy. They make for good monks.

      All the best, with metta. :-)

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you so much for your reply,

        Sorry it took me so long to write back, I literally wrote this about 6 times and got interrupted every time

        That is fantastic that you didn't fester and just went straight for it.

        I can relate to that in some ways, as I've only discovered Buddhism a year and a month ago, and it just fit all my questions from every angle which convinced me its the right path. I keep thinking why wait you cant do much better with your life, no time to waist.

        Scary/exciting as in it's most definitely the biggest decision one would make in their life

        Can I ask you one more question... I have some concerns as to whether my intentions are correct. It's the unsatisfactoriness of life that has brought me to these thoughts. I want more happiness in my life and because of the first noble truth, it seems a lot more likely that would come from taking ordination. However I'm afraid this "I" is drawing me to it, is it craving???

        Thank you so much for posting I am really grateful

        With Metta

        Jamie

        Thank you for that



        How

        Comment


        • #5
          is it craving???
          Well yes, you have to have some craving for an end of suffering to begin the path the leads to the end of suffering. Just remember that you take your suffering with you when you become a monk. That is part of the reason why we ordain people *slowly*. Give them a year as an anagarika, a year as a novice, and it shouldn't be too much of a shock to the system.

          Metta,

          J.R.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Bhikkhu Jhanarato View Post
            Well yes, you have to have some craving for an end of suffering to begin the path the leads to the end of suffering. Just remember that you take your suffering with you when you become a monk. That is part of the reason why we ordain people *slowly*. Give them a year as an anagarika, a year as a novice, and it shouldn't be too much of a shock to the system.

            Metta,

            J.R.
            Thank you very much for your help.

            Metta,

            jamie

            Comment


            • #7
              Hello Bhikkhu Jhanarato,

              I believe I have pretty much made up my mind, I just have to speak to a 2 more monks at monastery's close by and then we shall see.

              But I have one more question and it's not a deal breaker by any means, it more silly than that. If someone ask me what would you take to a desert island what would it be (bar my meditation stool) this would have to be my IPOD because music has always been the best thing in my life


              Even guessing what the answer would be. What are the rules around possessions like these.

              Comment


              • #8
                Dear Jamie,

                I'm afraid your iPod would not work very well on a desert island! (well, unless you bring a solar charger, I suppose).

                Many monastics have an mp3 player of some description for the purpose of listening to dhamma talks and learning chanting. Having music on the mp3 player would not generally be acceptable because it would be against the 7th precept (listening to music) and contrary to the principle of sense-restraint and seclusion (seclusion is seclusion of body, and seclusion of mind). At certain monasteries, mp3 players are not allowed at all for monks, it depends on the monastery.

                Metta,
                Ven. Nandiya.
                Last edited by Bhante Nandiya; 28th-April-2013, 09:10 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dear Kamie,

                  Please forgive me if my comment is irrelevant and found not so useful.

                  A disciple once asked Ajahn Brahm about his attachment to music. Ajahn Brahm said that it is ok for the time being as it is better than attachments to alcohol, gambling and other unwholesome stuff. However, Ajahn Brahm suggested that he could move from contemporary music (rock or whatever is in fashion right now) to Brahm's classical music and later to Ajahn Brahm's dhamma talks.

                  In no time at all will you find yourself enjoying dhamma talks.

                  Good luck.

                  With much metta,

                  Dhīrayūva

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=Bhante Nandiya;7901]Dear Jamie,

                    I'm afraid your iPod would not work very well on a desert island! (well, unless you bring a solar charger, I suppose).

                    Haha I suppose not, better avoid desert islands best as I can for the moment then

                    Hi Bhante,

                    I actually stayed at Amavarati this weekend. I got a much better view of what it was like at a monastery and while observing the diligence and determination of the monks with admiration for how they practice, I would quite a bit think back to fact that I had asked this question and I had to laugh at it with a touch of embarrassment. Yeah it seems like listening to Queen Bohemian Rhapsody before morning meditation wouldn't really fit in very well?!

                    I really enjoyed it though.

                    Metta

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Greetings to all.
                      I think I have attachment too to music , cinema and sensual pleasures in general but especially to music.
                      In DN 31 {8D.8} Sigalaka (Sigalovada o Singala) Sutta
                      The Budha explains that you shouldn't go to parties, play whith music etc. but he doesn't say Why?

                      Metta to all

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Dear Elias,

                        Because it is not conducive to meditation. But for the most part, it's not morally wrong. I say "for the most part" because there are certainly kinds of parties and shows which people with a strong moral code would most certainly avoid, and of course wherever there is alcohol (and/or drugs) the chances of getting into trouble increase quite dramatically, which doesn't quite prove it's morally wrong. But at least for monastics, people disapprove of monastics doing things which are even a bit dodgy.

                        Metta,
                        Ven. Nandiya.

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